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Food additives and hyperactivity in children, McCann D et al., Lancet. 2007 Sep 5

Paper

 

Food additives and hyperactivity in children, McCann D et al., Lancet. 2007 Sep 5

Details

A study conducted on behalf of the Food Standards Agency (FSA) found that children behave impulsively and lose concentration after a drink containing additives. This study has now been published in the Lancet (5th September 2007). Lead researcher Professor Jim Stevenson says the study, carried out at Southampton University, shows that certain combinations of artificial food colours (tartrazine (E102), ponceau 4R (E124), sunset yellow (E110), carmoisine (E122), quinoline yellow (E104) and allura red AC (E129) as well as the commonly used preservative sodium benzoate (E211) are linked to increases in hyperactivity. The FSA has met representatives of the food industry to talk about the study’s implications, but so far appear to be leaving it up to parents to scrutinise labels if they wish to prevent their children from consuming these additives. Campaigners point out that many foods that children eat do not come in a package with a label.

McCann D et al. 'Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial' Lancet. 2007 Sep 5.

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